The most basic HTML and CSS skills
Turn a flat design into an actual site
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CHRISTOPHER
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However you feel about the concept of designing in the browser, the reality is that more and more designers are adopting this as part of their workflow.
About that
Some, like Andy Clarke, treat it as the biggest part of the design process, allowing the client to see flexible layouts, type, and rendering engine treatments on the fly as a design comes together; others, like me or Mike Kus, use it as an extension of our Photoshop work: initial design is done offline and is completed by filling in the gaps while in the browser. It’s certainly not my intention to write about the merits and pitfalls of designing in the browser here, but the key point is that if you don’t know how to write HTML and CSS, it’s an avenue that’s completely closed off to you. The design process can begin and end entirely in your graphics app, but because websites will not (and should not) look the same in every browser, the design will not actually be complete until it’s coded.
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Benefits
_Test fonts
_Test design in browsers
_Test versions online
_Designer ir the king of details
_Working knowledge
_Faster design process
“ Of course, I realise that’s an extreme; many no-code designers are well versed in the web and produce great work. But wouldn’t a little more knowledge go one step further? The key point is that if you don’t know how to write HTML and CSS, it’s an avenue that’s completely closed off to you."
Elliot Jay Stocks / designer, speaker, and author
All content used in this page is taken from amazing Elliot Jay Stocks blog post
Web designers who can't code